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DowsingAndPendulum

DOWSING

Perhaps, dowsing is best known for locating water (dowsing for water), gold, oil, and other minerals, but as a dowser, I have also used pendulum dowsing to find missing keys, eyeglasses, jewelry, and literally anything I put my mind to.
Pendulum dowsing has also been called "divining" for its ability to provide information and predict the future. The term "pendulum dowsing" is often used to refer to the search for specific targets, while the term "pendulum divining" is most often used in reference to seeking precise information. 


Some supporters of dowsing are:
The American Academy of Science, The Academy of Sciences of Paris, The Canadian Ministry of Agriculture, The British Academy of Science, The British Army, The Smithsonian Institution, The U.S. Marines, The former Soviet Union, The Government of the Netherlands, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, National Aeronautics and Space Administration and many private and public utilities workers throughout the world.

Historically, dowsing has been known for its ability to locate water, gold, oil and other minerals, but it has also been used in many instances involving issues of life and death. In France, physicians have used the pendulum to assist them in making diagnoses; the use of the pendulum is officially considered to be a science known throughout Europe as Radiesthesia or in French "Radiesthesie". Many people have used the pendulum to detect allergies and other ailments, and even to accurately determine the gender and birth date of unborn babies (baby gender prediction).  Throughout history, people have turned to the pendulum to guide them when their lives were at stake. In dire circumstances during the Vietnam war, some U.S. marines were taught to use a pendulum to locate underground mines and tunnels.

History presents many accounts of the successes of dowsing, including those from officious sources. Britain's Weekly Telegraph of July 20th, 1994 reported the following obituary: "Colonel Kenneth Merrylees, the water-diviner who has died aged 97, worked during the Second World War as a bomb-disposal expert, when he used his dowsing skills to find bombs with delayed-action fuses which had penetrated deep into the ground." The pendulum has also had its share of controversy throughout history. During the Cold War in the 1960's, American pendulist Verne Cameron was invited by the government of South Africa to use his pendulum to help them locate their country's precious natural resources, but he was denied a passport by the U.S. government. A few years earlier, he had demonstrated his special dowsing talent to the U.S. Navy, successfully map dowsing (locating on a map) every submarine in the Navy's fleet. He shocked Navy officials by not only locating every American submarine, but also every Russian submarine in the world. Afterwards, the CIA determined that Cameron was a risk to national security, and he was forbidden to leave the United States.

HOW DOES PENDULUM DOWSING WORK?

Just as radios pick up information from unseen radio waves, the pendulum is a powerful antenna that receives information from the vibrations and energy waves emitted by people, places, thoughts and things. Noted physicist, Albert Einstein, was known to perform impressive feats with such dowsing tools. He believed that it had to do with electromagnetism: just as birds migrate following the earth's magnetic field, dowsers react to energies that are unseen and still not fully understood.  Some people say that the pendulum creates a bridge between the logical and intuitive parts of the mind. Some say that the pendulum connects them with a higher power and call it "divining" as the information is believed to come from a divine source. Research by many scientists indicates that the pendulum responds to electromagnetic energy that radiates from everything on Earth.

No one knows for sure how the pendulum works, but the important thing is that it does work! As Thomas Edison is said to have replied when asked about electricity: "I don't know what it is, but it's there, let's use it." Other famous dowsing advocates in history include Leonardo De Vinci (inventor), Robert Boyle (father of modern chemistry), Charles Richet (nobel prize winner), and General Patton (U.S. Army).

Another way of looking at it is realizing that a TV antenna can pick up invisible rays and translate them into pictures, so perhaps the inherent electrical current of the brain can also act as a receiver for which the pendulum serves as a transmitter. But regardless, even if you do not understand how the pendulum works, just as most people don't know the inner workings of a television or telephone, you can still benefit from its use. 

How you believe it works may be secondary to the fact that it actually does work - and you can experience it for yourself, book a dowsing session now with me. 
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